Wednesday, March 27, 2013

The Value of YOU!

 
The Peer Referral & Orientation Staff (PROS) of Camden County Technical School would like to take a moment of your valuable time to recognize you as a truly important individual and a very special person. You may get beat up and knocked down by life, but always know that you have value that cannot be diminished. See this value in yourself, and then others will see your value as well. Please take a moment to watch this amazing video that one of our members created to illustrate this point.
 
 
P.M.A. ALL DAY!

Thursday, March 21, 2013

ANIMOTO!

CHECK OUT THE VIDEOS THAT I MADE FOR MY GRAD CLASS USING ANIMOTO!
Try our video maker at Animoto.

Technology Plan Adoption Process @ CCTS!


THE EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGY AND THE HUMAN RACE!





"Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek."
-Barack Obama




Friday, March 15, 2013

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: March 15, 44 B.C.

The word Ides comes from the Latin word “Idus” and means “half division” especially in relation to a month. It is a word that was used widely in the Roman calendar indicating the approximate day that was the middle of the month. The term ides was used for the 15th day of the months of March, May, July, and October, and the 13th day of the other months.[1] The Ides of March was a festive day dedicated to the god Mars and a military parade was usually held.

In modern times, the term Ides of March is best known as the date on which Julius Caesar was killed in 44 B.C. Caesar was stabbed (23 times) to death in the Roman Senate by a group of conspirators led by Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. The group included 60 other co-conspirators according to Plutarch.[2]

According to Plutarch, a seer had foreseen that Caesar would be harmed not later than the Ides of March and on his way to the Theatre of Pompey (where he would be assassinated), Caesar met that seer and joked, “The ides of March have come”, meaning to say that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied “Ay, Caesar; but not gone.”[3] This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare‘s play Julius Caesar, when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to “beware the Ides of March.”[4][5]

(Source: Wikipedia)